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 Elsa
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(@elsa)
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What happened in 1971?

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(@belladonna)
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I notice so many people deciding to become an agent as well.. or talk about it...

my guess was because it's a lower investment (it's not like going to a university for a degree) that is more accessible at later eras of life for those that either never earned a degree, want a change of course for whatever reason, &/or feel like they went astray and don't have the security they wish they'd now built. 

I could be totally wrong of course ... that was just my only thinking based on the people that seem to go this route at seemingly random points

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 Elsa
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@belladonna I was thinking something similar but looking at the root. I wondered if they did not come out with the schools to teach agents at that time.

I think a real estate license is like buying a timeshare. A few may benefit but most don't get off the ground.  It's harder than they think - it's very competitive. You have to split your commission for a time or for X many sales. I think the majority never get beyond this period.

On the other hand, if you're cut out for it / good at it /enjoy it, it's a great gig.

My point though, is they are selling you the education... which does not mean you'll make money with it.  I find it's either boom or bust which is probably like any other gig. 

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jana
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 jana
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I believe it may be demographic. The baby boomers were having kids and buying lots a shit including houses. The suburbs were in full blossom. We are lucky in the USA. Europe and Asia moved into the cities and didn't have as many kids so they are going into population collapse before we do. No consumption.... economies crash. 

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(@belladonna)
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Posted by: @elsa

A few may benefit but most don't get off the ground.  It's harder than they think - it's very competitive.

Posted by: @elsa

On the other hand, if you're cut out for it / good at it /enjoy it, it's a great gig.

 

100% agree

 

it can be said for many things... because at the end of the day it's still a version of running your own business... l

like yoga teachers, so many yoga teachers... go get your yoga certification... but just because you know yoga doesn't mean you attract students, know how to pitch yourself to studios or how to market yourself etc... the teacher is their own business essentially...

so that's why i think people see it as a seemingly easy way out of the dead road they feel they're on, but it ends up taking them no where for the reasons you mentioned

it's way harder than people think... very competitive plus there are so many other factors knowledge-wise than just knowing the market, what about understanding the actual details of the house and design... 

I have Mars Gemini - I'm a charismatic sales person! but I don't know shit about houses... nor do I care 

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 Elsa
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@belladonna I've seen it go both ways, wildly. Wild success right out of the gate and people who were horrific at it. 

If you hate people, you're in trouble, that's for sure!

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Myrna
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I would think the boom coincided with he beginning of people moving to unknown places.  Before that most transactions happened between people who knew each other locally.

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la_sirena
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I have a few family members who do this on the side, mostly for people they already know, or someone they know who knows someone who is looking to sell/buy. I think it’s worth it. If you sell just one house, you make all the money spent on your education and then some back. 

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