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Oh God, Puberty!

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Elsa
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I came across some pictures of a young man in the throes of puberty. It made me think of my son at this age.  It's soooo awkward.

This made me think of myself at that age.  I was so consumed with my internal deal, it never occurred to me that people who had to witness it... well it's supernatural, isn't it.  Natural but also super. What a transformation!

What do you recall about going through puberty? How about your kids?  Grandkids?

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Plutolover
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Ugh, I remember it being an excruciating time! I developed fairly early and felt so out of place next to my peers and then I had all the unwanted attention from immature boys.... throw in hormones and periods and it was just a really uncomfortable time.

On the other hand, my son seemed to sail through puberty. He matured emotionally first, then slowly his body caught up. I was secretly looking forward to the 'squeaky voice' phase, because it's sweet, but it didn't happen, his voice just slowly deepened over time.

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jana
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We moved when I was 11 and had a rough transition. I was really depressed 12-16.  I ended up quitting school. I did come out of it eventually but it was bleak for awhile. 

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la_sirena
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I enjoyed it, it made me feel I was coming into my own power as a young woman. I didn’t go through an awkward phase with puberty. Can’t say if it made me bitchy or not. You’d have to ask my parents.

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Rapunzelsoldierfish
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I kinda felt like a boy up until age 16-17 since I was a late bloomer. I dressed like a tomboy because being a girly girl didn't really make much sense (my chart leans toward masculinity).  I remember looking at the other girls and wondering why the f*ck would I want to curl my hair and dress like some kind of fake barbie doll for men to look at. But then the hormones finally came and I felt like an actual woman lol

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Warped
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Late 60's.  I wanted to be an archeologist, or a designer in Paris, or Mrs. Peel.  I was a bookworm with a fashion obsession.  Late bloomer, stuffed Kleenex in my 28AA bras.  Hopeless crush on a sun-kissed Kennedy-ish boy who went off to boarding school after 8th grade.  Equally smitten with a Cheever-esque teacher who held court with the nerds after class and called us the "intelligentsia." 

I dug for treasure in old farmhouse ruins, made bell bottoms in Home Ec sewing class, perfected my tree-climbing skills. Thank God I was too shy and nerdy to hang with the in crowd!

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Rapunzelsoldierfish
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@warped 🤩 You could write a book about this... have you already? You write like you are painting! You make the magic of it all even more magical. What a contrast from today's world...

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@rapunzelsoldierfish 

Thank you so much!  You flatter me.  To "paint with words" is my highest accolade for writers I love.  My dad was a painter, I did draw constantly until books stole me away from drawing.   

No, I haven't, but I've got so many stories. I always intended to write but I'm too lazy!  And too busy enjoying what so many others have written.  Still so many books on my TBR list, not to mention favorites to reread.

One of my favorite authors, Mary Wesley,  began at 70, so who knows!  Try her -- quirky and riveting.  And for a taste of what I was reading in the late '60s, try the early novels of Mary Stewart -- very "painterly" -- you'll be transported to places I longed to see, some of which I eventually did.

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Rapunzelsoldierfish
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@warped I wanted more when I was done reading your reply up there - that's definitely a sign to be a writer! I was starting to write a book recently but I got a little depressed at the prospect of being chained to a book. And I need to learn how to not be so outcome-driven, stop thinking about word counts and money, and just go with the flow (in other words, do what my north node is telling me to do...) 

Thank you for the recommendation - she sounds amazing! Any particular book by her that you would recommend to start with? 

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@rapunzelsoldierfish 

There are writers who write as a job, with deadlines, discipline, pressure, even poverty looming if they don't produce.  Not appealing!  Then there are others who write to share, enlighten, amuse -- much more fun I think.  If you can write at a pace you enjoy, crafting something that pleases you, without making it a chore, do it.  Don't worry about publishing until you have at least a rough draft, then find the right venue instead of vice versa.

Mary Wesley had to write -- her husband died and left her penniless at 70.  But she'd had a fascinating life rich with material to draw from.  Start with "The Chamomile Lawn" which was beautifully made into a BBC film also.  Her books are all very different, but in each you'll find autobiographical elements.  Another favorite is "Part of the Furniture."

Mary Stewart's first novel, "Madam, Will You Talk?" was published when she was in her 40s and had taught English Lit and Classics for years.  It's set in Marseille, and like all her early books, it's a wild ride intricately woven with classic themes and allusions.  Fast paced suspense in an exotic locale with a side of romance. Or you can start with "My Brother Michael," in fascinating Delphi, "This Rough Magic," (Corfu), or my first and perhaps favorite, "The Ivy Tree," in northern England.  I've never read her later fantasy historical novels, though I should try one.

Two more for fun:  the deliciously eccentric "I Capture the Castle," by Dodie Smith (also a gorgeous film). And a short novel by Rosamund Pilcher, "Sleeping Tiger" -- far more exciting than her best sellers.

Who has time to write when there's so much to read?!

 

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Rapunzelsoldierfish
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@warped Thank you!! I'm going to add these to my TBR!

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