Food as Medicine - ...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Food as Medicine - Diet and Lifestyle  

Page 1 / 3

CocoPeaches
Posts: 397
Registered
Reputable Member
Joined: 10 years ago

Discussions about personal diet and lifestyle choices have taken off on the Mars in Aries 2020 thread.

Continuing in the spirit of self-help, this new thread is specifically to discuss the topic of healing through diet and lifestyle changes, various "food as medicine" approaches, and any other DIY health and wellness philosophies that you'd like share!

Are you committed to a certain routine that works for you - physically, mentally, and spiritually? Or are you still searching for a way to feel better in your body? Tell us what works for you, or what you've tried, and *please add the Astrology when possible!*

53 Replies
Vesta
Posts: 1092
Registered
Prominent Member
Joined: 1 year ago

I have been meaning to ask a question and didn't know where to address. Thank you, @Cocopeaches for giving me the space.

Is cheese considered processed food? 

Reply
14 Replies
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@vesta  I think, by definition, milk goes through a process to become cheese... but some cheese is definitely more processed than other cheese. I think you must look at the ingredients to know for sure how much cheese is in your cheese product. There's a huge difference between raw, unpasteurized cheese, and processed cheese products which can be cut other non-cheese ingredients.

Reply
strawb.
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 988

@cocopeaches

I agree. I don't consider aged cheddar or feta processed, but things like Kraft singles and cream cheese are. I think once you add coloring, additives, thickening or anti-caking agents (gums), preservatives, youre pretty much off the mark. Reading the labels will tell you.

I consider even certain non dairy alternative milks to be very processed and don't buy them. I pay a little extra for almond or oat milk that's literally the only ingredient + water. I'm lactose intolerant so it helps me a lot. 

Reply
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@vesta You inspired me to pick up my copy of Nourishing Traditions to see what it says about cheese...

Nourishing Traditions

The back cover reads "Modern food processing denatures our foods but Ancient preservation methods actually increase nutrients in fruits, nuts, vegetables, meats, and milk products!" That's basically what I was trying to get at with my comment about questioning exactly how a food is "processed."

I went to the chapter on cultured dairy products, and there I found a recipe for legit cream cheese which is produced by beneficial bacteria (not the same as what you'd find at a regular grocery store). Not all cheese is created equal!

"Like the process of sprouting grains, fermentation of milk results in numerous beneficial changes. Fermentation breaks down casein, or milk protein, one of the most difficult proteins to digest. Culturing restores many of the enzymes destroyed during pasteurization including lactase, which helps digest lactose or milk sugar, and numerous enzymes, which help the body absorb calcium and other minerals. Lactase produced during the culturing process allows many people who are sensitive to fresh milk to tolerate fermented milk products. Both vitamin B and vitamin C content of milk increase during fermentation."

It goes on and on... I love this book.

Reply
Libra Noir
Registered
Joined: 9 years ago

Noble Member
Posts: 2258

@cocopeaches My Gemini sister gave me this book years ago and it rocked my world:)

Reply
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@libra-noir I bought this book ages ago, and at the time I mostly thought it was cool because it included a recipe for Kombucha. 🤗  As a cookbook it can be frustrating when I don't have half of the ingredients that a recipe calls for, because it wants completely raw, whole, 100% unprocessed items that are hard to find these days... but I love that the margins are filled with history and science and stories about  food, and it's always waiting patiently on my shelf for the next time I'm ready to embark on a new culinary adventure!

Reply
dolce
Registered
Joined: 12 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 488

@cocopeaches I love this book too. I'm a member of Weston A. Price. They are life savers!!

Reply
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@dolce Interesting! I have been wondering if there are some WAPF people among us on EE... Do you take steps to reduce your exposure to electromagnetic radiation?

Reply
dolce
Registered
Joined: 12 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 488

@cocopeaches I do, but I can't do much because I live in a highly populated area. My dream is to go rural!

Reply
Vesta
Registered
Joined: 1 year ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 1092

@cocopeaches Thank you for the recommendation. I will check out the book. I think I follow most of the traditions already, for one, because of my eastern roots and home food traditions, and secondly, because of great quality of fresh food in my adopted country. Its another topic that most of it is flown in from around the world. I try to consciously choose local produce as much as possible, but I only have the choice of choosing between Chinese or Peruvian ginger, which I can't live without in my tea. 

Reg cheese, I am worried about the mozzarella I consume in my home made pizzas and enchilladas etc. Its pre-shredded, adding to the look and feel of it being processed, but comes from a nationalized dairy cooperative and does not 'feel' or taste processed. Do you have any recommendations for self-produced instant cheese that I can use instead? I already use blocks of local hard cheese for pastas.

Reply
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@vesta That's awesome that you were raised with food traditions like that, and that you have access to fresh food in the country where you live now.

Honestly I don't know anything about self-produced instant cheese. The cream cheese recipe that I was referring to takes a couple days. Apparently there are a few different ways to do it, and one of them is actually based on a Scandinavian tradition. The Piima starter culture comes from cows who feed on a certain herb, and maybe that is the norm where you live.

For mozzarella, I always look for the pillowy balls that are often packaged in liquid (whey). I avoid buying pre-shredded stuff because it usually contains preservatives and anti-caking agents. I've never made my own cheese. But I have grown my own ginger... and that, my friend, is truly divine!

Reply
Vesta
Registered
Joined: 1 year ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 1092

@cocopeaches I already make my own cottage cheese overnight. Will try to find the Piima starter culture locally, great tip! To grow ginger myself on my balcony terrace, is the new goal! Thanks for the motivation! ❤

Reply
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@vesta It's a tricky one to grow in cold climates and requires a lot of patience, but is so succulent and totally worth all the trouble! I have had luck sprouting it indoors on a heat mat, and babying it a lot outdoors in the summer. It likes a wide, shallow, well-drained container because it grows laterally and is susceptible to rot.

Reply
Vesta
Registered
Joined: 1 year ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 1092

@cocopeaches Thanks! I think what I need is a tiny greenhouse. I dreamed of growing it, with a gnawing realization that I consume almost one whole bulb of ginger a week. No way I can avoid Peruvian or Chinese ginger for 54 weeks a year. :-/

Reply
CocoPeaches
Registered
Joined: 10 years ago

Reputable Member
Posts: 397

@vesta you and me both, on needing a greenhouse! I follow a wonderful greenhouse group and a winter-sowing garden groups (and food preservation groups too) on Facebook, so now when I go on social media, I'm mostly scrolling through greenhouse porn!

Reply
Justin
Posts: 397
Reputable Member
Joined: 1 month ago

Ooo, I like this topic! 🤗🤗🤗

I very nearly contributed something of note, but realised it would quickly turn into a tome! 😂

As succinctly as I can write it, I've swapped out ALL processed food for natural wholefood alternatives instead. It's an absolute life changer. I haven't felt as good physically since my late teens. It's almost akin to being given a new body. Old injuries occasionally give me grief, but nothing like this time last year.

I wish I'd made the change far sooner! 🤗🤗🤗

Reply
Libra Noir
Posts: 2258
Registered
Noble Member
Joined: 9 years ago

These things work for my system:

Meditation for me is number one, ultimate, supreme necessity to well being. Mercury in Scorpio needs to be in a fluid mental space from time to time. 

Another super good thing was quit drinking alcohol. Neptune in the 12th. I’ve also shied away from synthetic pharmaceuticals of any kind which I feel is a benefit to my energetic clarity. I get “gunked up” and bogged down easily by certain chemicals. 

I love wheatgrass juice (saving up for a good juicer. Would love to have a daily shot). Venus in Virgo. 

There’s some sulfur hot springs near me, that I used to go to before covid. It’s at a resort and there are private tubs set on a wooded hillside. It’s so gorgeous and the water is just high vibration. I think that’s Libra Sun (beauty) and Venus in Virgo because I go in nekked (purity) and water of course Scorpio Moon. (I wonder what rules sulfur?) 

Like I said in the other thread, I stopped eating meat. I can’t attribute that to any transit except for possibly the nn transiting my sixth house. There’s also a spiritual element too that I can’t attribute to any astrological influence although I’m sure it’s there somewhere. 

Oh, and I get PLENTY of sleep. It’s an absolute necessity. I am a straight up bitch when I’m tired. 

I used to love to get massages when I could trade services with my massage therapist. Someday I would like to be able to afford to get one bimonthly. Scorpio Moon likes sensual experiences. 

Lavender. Lavender. Lavender. (The plant).

As we talked about in the other thread, I also work with elements (they are all represented on my meditation altar), although it’s more of an intuitive thing than how I presented it. I can FEEL what I need. I think that’s Scorpio Moon too. Often I can feel what others need too, on that elemental level. 

Reply
1 Reply
Vesta
Registered
Joined: 1 year ago

Prominent Member
Posts: 1092

@libra-noir I need more lavendar in my life then.

Reply
dolce
Posts: 488
Registered
Reputable Member
Joined: 12 years ago

Zero carb carnivore made me the healthiest I've ever been. Right now my stomach is a mess with pregnancy hormones or I'd still be doing it. Highly recommend Smile

I have staying power in my astro make-up - Saturn/Mars. This diet was extreme but I have the mental focus I need when I want something, and patience to see it through. I can also be intense, with my Pluto-Sun. 

Reply
Osiris Wife
Posts: 1934
Registered
Noble Member
Joined: 2 years ago

I became a vegetarian years ago and I've never looked back. My mental, emotional, physical health improved so much that it inspired me to continue to make changes in other aspects of my life. Not only food related. Earlier this year I quit sugars i.e. all refined sugars and carbohydrates, processed foods and most fruits.

I truly feel authentic, more than at any other time in my life. Also, I am no longer insatiably or consistently hungry. That's because along the way in this journey, I found what and how to truly feed my Moon by listening to my body.

My workouts are now largely centered around the yin and yang flow of energy in my body. 

Reply
Page 1 / 3

Leave a reply

Author Name

Author Email

Title *

Maximum allowed file size is 2MB

 
Preview 0 Revisions Saved