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Elsa
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Carl Sagan

I'm a highly curious person. I've this way all my life. I'm constantly asking questions. I genuinely want to know things; other people's opinions. I want their ideas and such.  It's one of the primary things in my life.

I came across this graphic; it seems to be true.  If so, it also seems tragic.

I wonder if it's the Leo in my chart - something childlike, that keeps me this way,

What do think the problem is?  What's killing this natural inclination? What comes in to replace it?

The things I come up with are super-negative.  I'm hoping someone else can do better!

Thanks.

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mokihana
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Me, too! I am as curious as all get out, can't say I've always been curious but there is that Leo in me too and I keep looking for ways to blossom. My curiosity has grown as I've aged. And though I'm not sure that naturally happens with people, I think it could if we give ourselves the room to be wrong as we explore all that curiosity as questions and adventures come up.

Yesterday I have a chance encounter with a young woman ... real life, in a garden, in the dirt digging weeds and talking about so deal stuff. She said, "I like to be right." Without stopping my weeding I said, "Yeah, I can relate to that. And than, I found out I've been wrong a lot." She asked, "Then what?" We went on weeding and digging into dirt and had a fascinating conversation for about an hour.

That's the thing there in the garden where nature and human life conjoin, curiosity has a much broader trail to explore. More questions and unexpected answers can happen. As a metaphor for what Cagan's observation repeats itself, kindergarten limited to a classroom with walls and curricula that has 'set answers' will box in native curiosity. No room to dig up worms that lead to fascinating conversation.

I started my work life as a classroom primary school teacher but didn't stay. Broader exploration and settings for teacher can be such a different world for encouraging curiosity.

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PurpleStarGirl
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I'm always curious. I think it has to do with my packed third house and Aquarius planets.

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NotMyCircus
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This is something Ben Carson addressed in one of his books, back when he was a pediatric neurosurgeon. I can't find the reference, but it had to do with 98% of people being born creative, and how that number drops drastically by age 15. He talked about we are not taught to think for ourselves. Look at adults. We watch the news, but we don't dissect and analyze it for ourselves. Instead we receive the news from people who have decided which stories they think are important....then they dissect and analyze the news FOR us, and tell us what our opinions should be on the news we heard or read. 

Don't believe me? Go watch FOX, CNN or MSNBC one evening (or pick up a newspaper) and tell me they don't word things and use a certain tone to sway the opinions of their audiences. See if you can pick up a bit of a patronizing, "let me tell you what _____ is" vibe.

 

 

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Poppy
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@notmycircus, Courage, stay true.  You're doing amazingly, often, throughout.  Remember that, hey?

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NotMyCircus
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Another thing: While I admire and respect schoolteachers, the public school absolutely can stifle creativity if teachers aren't careful. We are taught to not color outside the lines, not to fidget or daydream in class (I almost got paddled for this, I shit you not), and not even to dye our hair an unnatural shade.

My uber-Aquarian mom thought it was so stupid that my 4th grade teacher had an issue with me not being able to help form a single-file line with my classmates. The teacher was going to reform me by having me spend a month learning how to get it right. She thought it was ludicrous to make children learn how to make a perfect single-file line. This is one of many times I had trouble falling in line at school--and this was a lab school!! They were an experimental school by nature, but this was in the South. Anyway, I had problems staying organized as a kid, so my 2nd-grade teacher assigned an organizational helper to assist me in keeping my cubby straight and supplies organized. Crazy thing is, organizational skills run in my family. My mom and grandmother are ninjas in this department. Some of it rubbed off on me, but apparently not enough at that age. 

Sorry this is so wordy. I probably didn't answer your questions. Two things that I do find that helps with stirring up natural curiousity are reading books and visiting interactive museums (the kind where you get to touch stuff and walk through 3D exhibits--learn by DOING rather than reading cards on walls next to still life exhibits, which is BORING for Sagittarius Rising.)

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dolce
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@notmycircus I can verify this as a former teacher - with so many children in one room, they have to be "managed." You can't allow for a ton of creativity. You're given a curriculum and subjects to teach, sometimes they expect you to teach from a script like a robot, and the kids just regurgitate the info. Younger grades it's not so bad, but the emphasis is on "rigor," a word they even use for kindergarteners.

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Libra Noir
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Ya, every reason that I can think of is pretty negative too. What positive force could encourage complacency? 

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